Dr. Scott D. Coon, DC
Chiropractor,  College Professor, Health Delivery Consultant
Tri-County Chiropractic, PC
1387 Fairport Road, Suite 520
Fairport, NY 14450
(585) 425-9820  Voice
(585) 230-5324  Text
 










                Find me on Facebook     My Professional Profile     Email Me!

PATIENT FORMS

ABOUT DR. COON

SERVICES  PROVIDED

CONTACT ME

GET DIRECTIONS

TESTIMONIALS

PHOTOS

MY LINKS

PHYSICAL FITNESS

MY DOWNLOADS

 
CONDITIONS TREATED
BACK PAIN
LOW BACK PAIN
MID-BACK PAIN
SI DYSFUNCTION
DISC HERNIATION
SPRAIN/STRAIN
 
NECK PAIN
WHIPLASH (CADS)
CERVICAL DISC
HEADACHES
TMJ (JAW)
 
EXTREMITY PAIN
SHOULDER
ELBOW
WRIST
HIP
KNEE
ANKLE

Neck Pain is the 2nd most common complaint we treat:

I always get the question, "What caused my neck to 'go out?'".  In some cases it is obvious; lifting something to heavy, falling down, getting in a car accident... but in a lot of cases, the cause is unknown.

This can be very frustrating for the injured because we all want to know 'why this is happening to me?' 

Most commonly; muscles, ligaments, cartilage, nerves and bones are the 5 tissue types involved in low back pain.  It can me one of these tissue types or any combination of all 5 tissue types that trigger back pain.

Sprain/Strain involves the muscles and ligaments.

Arthritis involves the cartilage and bones.

Disc herniation and 'pinched nerves' involved the cartilage and bones.

Once inflammation occurs, there is a chemical change to the region of involvement that allows our tissues to be more sensitive to pain.  We actually become more efficient in sensing pain with the more pain we have. This sensitization to pain can lead to chronic pain syndromes.

Mechanical stimulation (ie. massage, stretching, spinal adjustments) to the tissues and joints of the back result in stimulation of movement nerve receptors.  Stimulation of these receptor types help to inhibit pain and reduce inflammation.

 

Chiropractic Research 

Numerous studies have shown that chiropractic treatment is both safe and effective.  The following are excerpts from a few of the more recent studies.  By examining the research supporting chiropractic care, you will find that chiropractic offers tremendous potential in meeting today’s health care challenges.


For Acute and Chronic Pain

“Patients with chronic low-back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction at one month than patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients. A higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56 percent vs. 13 percent) reported that their low-back pain was better or much better, whereas nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low-back pain was worse or much worse.”

– Nyiendo et al (2000), Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

In a Randomized controlled trial, 183 patients with neck pain were randomly allocated to manual therapy (spinal mobilization), physiotherapy (mainly exercise) or general practitioner care (counseling, education and drugs) in a 52-week study. The clinical outcomes measures showed that manual therapy resulted in faster recovery than physiotherapy and general practitioner care. Moreover, total costs of the manual therapy-treated patients were about one-third of the costs of physiotherapy or general practitioner care.

 -- Korthals-de Bos et al (2003), British Medical Journal


In Comparison to Other Treatment Alternatives

“Acute and chronic chiropractic patients experienced better outcomes in pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction; clinically important differences in pain and disability improvement were found for chronic patients.”

– Haas et al (2005), Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

“In our randomized, controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner in patients with nonspecific neck pain. The success rate at seven weeks was twice as high for the manual therapy group (68.3 percent) as for the continued care group (general practitioner). Manual therapy scored better than physical therapy on all outcome measures. Patients receiving manual therapy had fewer absences from work than patients receiving physical therapy or continued care, and manual therapy and physical therapy each resulted in statistically significant less analgesic use than continued care.”

– Hoving et al (2002), Annals of Internal Medicine

 

Copyright 2010, drscottcoon.com
                    
Report broken links or any other problems to drcoon@drscottcoon.com.  Copyright  2010-2012